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economies like spain -- >> good or bad surprise? >> no, a good surprise. whereas economies like spain, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is g
in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want to draw your attention here. the ten-year gild in the u.k., 1.957%. extraordinary. we're not off the 2% market in the spread, widening significantly. coming up on the program today, the count is set to get underway in south korea following general elections. we'll head to seoul to find out whether the country could elect its first female leader. >>> the bank of england releases minutes from its latest polic
half a percent, as well. take a look at bond yields. we looked at that auction yesterday from spain. they raised 4.3 billion. years went lower. nevertheless spanish yields today 5.4%, slightly lower from where we closed, but they did move up substantially after a handle of 5.2. we'll keep our eye on gilts, as well. we'll look ahead to the bank of england. nothing expected from them, of course. 1.8%. david miles was the only man who voted for more qe at the last meeting. as far as currency rates are concerned, euro-dollar at the moment 1.3068, just below the highs during the says. dollar-yen fairly contained. sterling-dollar steady 1.61. so pretty much as you were on some of those compared to this time yesterday. so what about the sazian session? only one lady to tell us. >> thank you, ross. asian markets ended mix. japan's bourses outperformed the region. despite a slight improvement in november corporate sentiment showed weakness. knee sap finished lower as they planned to recall nearly 50,000 cars in japan. shanghai composite pulled back after yesterday's 3% surge. investors booke
-debt nations like spain or greece, then you are probably going to see that safety play back off a little bit. > there are always places to park money. good to have you on the show this morning. have a great trading day. > > you too. if you're not yet fully awake this monday, here's one thing to open your eyes: after years of higher and higher coffee prices to consumers, brazil, which produces a third of the world's coffee, may turn prices around. a record crop there last year is being followed by another bumper crop. our cover story takes a look at what it means for coffee futures and retailers. brazil is expecting a record coffee crop again, just one year after its biggest harvest ever. "that would be a fabulous production." jack scoville, a commodities broker in chicago, says the bumper crop is the direct result of more coffee farms planted in brazil when a series of small crops drove prices high a couple of years ago. "it's because new trees and new areas are coming on." falling futures aren't great for investors, but may have coffee consumers buzzing. "if it's premium coffee, i'll buy a
, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval in nevada but the biggest step of all is a change in federal law, and if online gambling does become legal nationwide, zynga is sure to face some big competition from the casinos. zynga is struggling to sel
in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have the latest on not just the breakdown of this offer, but by the response of some key senators this morning. good morning. >> yeah, that's right, carl. we saw the offer come in late last night and now we'r
. companies around the world, spain, peril around the world. cars around the world. multinational companies that are doing stuff right in this environment. we think that is the formula, broad-based market and the people that are executing within that. ashley: aren't you concerned about continued volatility in that area? italian elections coming up in february, german elections not far behind that, has to be seen whether angela merkel can survive that. does that give you cause for concern? >> there is no question about that. every election that has happened in the last two or three years, the incumbent has been evicted from office. you can worry about angela merkel, our guess is she is doing other than the rest of them and will survive, there's plenty to worry about that is what makes overall the market depressed and therefore attractive. ashley: you like the auto sector and insurance, tell us a little bit about that. >> insurance kind of our chicken way of finance. we are not comfortable with the euro banks we think the insurance companies are in much better shape, they came off of catastro
for those worried about europe, spain, portugal, the u.s. and the fiscal cliff, what do you say? >> the easiest thing to do is to take advantage of fear. when people are fearful like the y2k example, it was obviously an easy process to make money from there on out. we will get through this. the fiscal cliff. liz: you have seen it all, good to see you. good luck. one of our favorites. dow jones industrials hold onto gains of 96 points. can we hold all the way? we have six more minutes to go before the closing buildings. so glad you are hanging out with us at fox business. and we can save you 10% on ground shipping over the ups store. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of al. [ ma announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. he loves risk. t whher he's climbing everest, scuba divinghe great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, whicis why he trades with a company
so far. europe is moving things. not the united states. spain also by the way we didn't talk about this they officially asked for european funds to recapitalize their banking sectors. that's also a bit of good news. i want to talk about china because i got a lot of calls and questions about my comments last week on china. have you noticed we got good news on the manufacturing overnight on china. better than expected. november better than expected. the pmi numbers. guess the whole world went up. korea went up. everything went up except china. a lot of comments last week about what exactly is happening in china because china -- mainland china stock market is among of the worst performers for the whole year. we're down 11% in shanghai this year. hong kong is up 18%. how do you explain this? this was a huge debate in the last couple of weeks and of course a lot of people are@@ pointing to the fact that there's less stimulus than expected coming from the government. they haven't said anything but that's not the problem. this has been going on now for months and months on end. selling sh
than greece, more than spain. but conversely, china, if gdp is coming back, they are in what many consider to be a sweet spot. >> the numbers came out saturday for china. i think italy has been remarkably good. so this was a big game changer. italy had been a part of the good story of european recovery. now it's back. >> all to monti was never intended to be there for the long term. >> sure. >> in fact, he may be leaving a month earlier than originally planned. this should not be a surprise in the larger context. while we may mention berlusconi's name right now, he's not expected to win. >> look, we knew that monti was successful. >> it may be whoever follows him is going to roll some of the gains that he's had. so-called gains. >> that's going to cause ripples here. look, on saturday night, i said, we're going to have a nice opening. china's good, people know that monti is not really going to hurt italy. i think if china continues the momentum, but the number -- >> the ex sports were less than expected in the month of november. which is a concern. then there's this perverse glass
as you have a drag on the economy. you have negative growth, a recession in spain and italy this year. you also have negative growth in greece. there's only so much you can have of negative growth across the continent of europe before impact spending patterns across the world. there are positives out there but we have to be focused on the fact that these problems are not going to go away. one of every four people in spain are unemployed and under the age of 25. fifty-six% to not have a job. that is a major rest of the for disaster and the math does not work. if you try to fix a problem with negative growth and nobody working. dennis: a lesson here. one last note on the fed. what is your concern there? >> pretty simple. the fed has raised the credit market. yield and price are not real. they are buying up trillions of dollars of these bonds and i'm worried about the day when the market no longer listens to them. the market has not been bigger than the fed over the last few years. of the market gets bigger than the fed, look out. yields should be much higher than where they are and if w
seems to be fixed. it's fixed. even though they're in a bit of a recession, a lost generation in spain, are they really fixed? we'll ask mark grant the tough questions bottom of the hour. , we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> facebook experiencing its fourth lockup today. today 160 million shares hitting the market. our next guest is an author of the book "the facebook era" clara shih the president of a company that has enterprises with large store networks on facebook linked in and other social networks. welcome back and good to see you again. >> good to see you. thanks for having me. >> i wonder what your take is short term on the lockup expiration. we've had it both ways this year. where
, we had to baja, the bp oil spill, nuclear meltdown, debt downgrades, greece, italy, spain, foreclosures, student loans, how many things do we have to get fearful about before we start to believe in this economy? it is not booming. i am not saying it is perfect, not saying it is 1980s again, is not but is growing 2% per year, maybe 2.2, two.three, and it keeps growing. we have not had a recession since march of 2009. >> it is media granddad as almost people feel. if we take the consumer back and put them in the jobs report we did see the number of hours increase as did wages. what do you make of that? does that give you hope? >> it does. if you look at car sales in november, automobile sales, fifteen million vehicles were sold in november. highest since december of 2007. that weakness we saw in cars and auto sales in october and retail sales, i think because of sandy it is going to be over. november and december will be great month for the consumer. i do have hope. i don't think we're going to boom. we won't grow 4% we will grow between 2% and 3% real growth next year in 20
comes up over the year. liz: worried about greece and ireland and portugal, and italy, spain, then the election. go back to the primaries. what will happen with the primaries, then election, then fiscal cliff. it's always something. all you really saw if you look at one are to your charts of the s&p, dow, you name it. not exactly a straight shot, but it was a rally. people sitting on the sidelines terrified, shaking their hands saying we are not going to buy. look at the far left. now where we are today, you're looking at what some of you out there miss because you were scared. how did you convince people there is more room to run normally you don't believe that? >> for us it is very much business. with respect to these various crises are fears of the fiscal cliff for the election are what have you that the rate -- create uncertainties in investors' minds, it's often better to adjust to now. ridge example is the election. in early november right after words two weeks later, 11%, markets is just grew up. be classy about this. event guess what. yesterday or the day before we we
over the weekend. the ibex down over the weekend. so spain and portugal, seeing its index down over more than is % is showing its concern. joe, the ftse is at least holding up relatively better. it's down only .3% today. these losses follow a trading session that was setting up to be relatively strong. we saw asian stoxx doing decently well, so just kind of underscores how unhappy the market is this morning with this news out of italy. look at what's happening with debt. as we check in with bond markets, the italian tenure is seeing its yield rise. 4.88%. i know it doesn't seem that high, given some levels we were at last year. but if you consider that we've risen, i don't know, in the range of 30 to 40 basis points or .3 percentage points just on this news, it is pretty significant. spain, same thing, we're seeing 5.67 about the level there. other bond yields are benefiting as a result. back over to you guys. i'm sure carolin, too, can help us try to understand now what this all means with mario monti potentially still involved with the next eye toolan government. that may help rea
way or the other, we will. >> remember when we used to talk about spain? italy? >> the good old days. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other bra
the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a couple of the key questions will be how much mario draghi follows ben bernan bernanke's caps, maybe even cutting into positive territory. expect to hear plenty more about that in the weeks to come. but for now, some resolution means this is front and center for these fiscal cliffs. back over to you guys. >> kelly, have your b
the cliff that is force austerity, that is firing people. look at spain when they got serious. italy. it meant a lot of firings. he says i see what we are going to do follow these countries that have fiscal responsibility a lot of people are going to be fired. don't worry, i'm going to do my best. what what are you going to do to keep people employed? >> keeping the heat on congress, came up a number of times, of course energy the press conference that followed the fed announcement but unclear what impact it will have. >> and as far as ben bernanke can do only so much he can do we all know the market's addition to the additional stimulus and the more -- increased transparency in terms of what the fed is going to target in the future, that causes the stocks to go up for maybe an hour's worth of time and then resume trading as if nothing happened. >> in the years i have been following the fed there is always a strange dichotomy, seems like the market initially gets everything wrong. but what i have always felt, in the end, we take solace, if the fed says things are getting better we ge
and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace
. take 15% youth unemployment in spain and compound that with the fact they stop having babies. what happens in a generation or two. >> i tell you, bill, you got me thinking, i encourage readers to read this. in some of the biggest developed economies pushed the most growth are below a 2% utility rate. this has to be dealt with at some point. back to you. >> thanks, rick. >>> road trip and big bank is in highways an byways in the road for yield. we'll explain how. and actually. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. stamps.com is the best. i don't have to leave my desk and get up and go to the post office anymore. [ male announcer ] with stamps.com you can print real u.s. postage for all your letters and packages. i have exactly the amount of postage i need, the instant i need it. can you print only stamps? no... first class. priority mail. certified. international. and the mail man picks it up. i don't leave the shop anymore. [ male announcer ] get a 4 week trial plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com
and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. -- a single currency. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, and to reach far too much into the future to bring value to the peasant and to re
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. wanted to provide better employee benefits while balancing the company's bottom line, their very first word was... [ to the tune of "lullaby and good night" ] ♪ af-lac ♪ aflac [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ]
and what's happening in britain and spain and elsewhere, they have embarked upon deficit reduction. and what that has done is contract their economies when they still have very high unemployment, very high under utilization of a lot of resources that. means that their ratio of their debts to their total economies keeps on getting worse. if you want that kind of economy, that kind of austerity economics, well then what you want to do is raise taxes on the middle class and also cut government spending. if you don't you don't go that way. and casey, with all due respect, there are three people looking for jobs for every job opening these days. i don't see how you can say that they're being paid for not getting jobs. >> casey, why don't we put some incentives into this economy? why don't we make it pay to work after taxes? why don't we make it pay more to invest after tax? while we're doing that, casey, why don't we shrink the size and scope of government so that the private sector can keep its own resources and spend up more wisely than the government will? >> well, you're asking me t
the lines of what spain did or ireland or greece, cut back our social programs dramatically. we'll have to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on erin and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business and th
maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change now. there are a handful of incredibly smart, professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend
had a 1.75 yield close. if we look towards spain and their 10-year, there isn't a lot to see on this intraday chart except for we've heard a lot about buy-backs and how great it is. today we had a public auction and they didn't show up for the entire amount. a dozen basis points isn't huge and these levels around 5.40 are a lot lower than they've been but this is something to pay attention to. >>> super storm sandy and anxiety over the fiscal cliff affecting job growth. adp showing the private sector created 115,000 positions last month. the expectation was about 125,000. it comes ahead of friday's key employment report and to talk about that and more, our senior economics reporter steve leisman joins us from washington. steve, we'll talk about your interview with secretary geithner in a moment but let's talk about those economic numbers. what about today's, what about friday's? >> before i get to the adp number, i have new information i've been able to report on the way down here from new york. that is, be prepared on friday for potentially, especially in the household surve
. greece and spain. liz: jeff looks like he's about to damage you. go ahead, jeff. >> are well, you know, they're going to make a deal in washington. i lived inside the beltway, have a pretty good network inside the beltway. cantor is worried -- excuse me, not cantor, boehner is worried about not being reelected as speaker of the house. they can't vote on that until january 4th with the new congress on that. cantor wants that job. so i think boehner's going to press for a deal, i think he's going to go ahead and allow president obama to raise taxes to 39.6%, and i think that'll take the edge off the fiscal cliff. david: let's take this discussion out of the beltway and into the real world. the economy, and, jeff, i want to start with you because you're bullish, but if you're so bullish, hy are you downgrading housing right now? >> because our housing team made a really good call on the housing stocks, and they outran their valuations on a short to intermediate-term basis. they downgraded them about two months ago. liz: okay, so where's the money? show it to us. >> i like just about ever
it was dubai and bp oil spill or greece or spain or the deleveraging or foreclosures. any of these things that we're supposed to take us out and yet we keep moving. i think the fiscal cliff is another one of these. >> let me ask you about the timing then. deutsche bank had a note out yesterday where they suggested that central banks have bought us a six months of time on the markets. if pmis do not improve, will we see growth? what would you say to that view? >> i mean, i'm pretty simple on this. i do not believe and we could debate this probably all day that quantitative easing itself has helped the economy at all. banks put that money right back to the fed as excess reserves. it hasn't boosted money in the economy. i don't believe that we've seen a false rally or sugar high. i think the growth in the economy and growth in the markets has been driven by productivity and profits. i think it's real. it's slow. it's real. we're going to have a weak fourth quarter. i believe most of that weakness is because of sandy. we're going to pick up later in the quarter. we'll have 2.5% to 3% growth n
of a small town in spain christmas came a little early. they have won the bulk of the country's annual christmas lottery that pays out $2.2 billion. it usually goes thousands of winners. the biggest prize was won by residents of this town near madrid. spaniards usually buy tickets to share and share it amongst their friends and family so the joy is spread around. the so-called mayan end of the world prediction has come and gone. i think we're all still here, but tourists have good reason to get a taste of mayan history and culture in cheech knee za, mexico. nick parker gives us a look. >> i'm here in ancient mayan ruins of cheech i neat za where thousands came to mark the end of the world as some said. well, the world didn't end but there are still many, many good reasons to come and visit what has been described as one of the seven wonders of the modern world. chichen itza was one confident largest cities in the em buyer. it stretches out about five square kilometers of ground here in the yucatan. a lot of the architecture is still extremely imposing. it templeal corresponds to the ma
, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invesest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. live and in hd, this is an abc 7 news update. >> good morning. 7:26 on this tuesday, december 18. i am cynne simpson. you can drive a little faster major d.c.al commuter routes. stretches of several roads including new york avenue, capitolurg road, north street, and canal road. speed limits on parts of benning 295 were raised last month. an apparent home invasion and shooting in fort washington. suspects broke into a loflin road home overnight. the man confronted the then shot him. cash and jewelry. the man is expected to survive. news channel 8 will have more in in a fewbeginning minutes. get a look at today's commute with jamee whitten. good morning. >> good m
zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global onomy. is just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with cfidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> i'm robert gray with your fox business brief. t-mobile is finally getting a bite out of apple, adding the tech giant's products to it next year. deutsche telekom didn't mention specific products. ipad and iphone are only products offered. >>> hasbro is latest company moving up payment of its quarterly dividend to avoid higher taxes for shareholders. the dividend payment of 36 cents a share will be sent to shareholders this month instead of next year. >>> general motors is planning to hike prices in india by as much as 3% in the new year. the automaker says the increase is response to escalating input costs and currency fluctuations in the nation. suzuki and hyundai alr
wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipperverage. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investmeninformation, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. stuart: all right everybody. let's talk california. it's been another banner year for the formerly golden state. voters approving carbon taxes on business. higher taxes on themselves. and the state overwhelmingly voted for the president in the election. more than 60% of the state voting in favor of president obama for his reelection. let's bring in our next guest. he is chairman of the republican party in california. i'm not being sarcastic but i didn't think the republicans existed in california any longer. you are their chairman, is that correct? >> it is. it was a rough year. stuart: what does 2013 hold in store for california? >> well, actua
else is going on, and the children of the rich are shipped out. even the rich in spain, the children all of them are saying to their kids study and live abroad. their foundation for the future is eroding. stuart: that number, 145 million euros, that's that's about 180 million bucks, he's paid that in his lifetime and the french government says that's not enough, we want more. >>. charles: according to hollande, it's not his fair share. >> and why, if the government is going to take three quarters of it. stuart: a patriotic duty to pay your fair share. you know i don't mean that-- >> and how our spending has gone up and plus the latest and most important read on the housing numbers. breaking numbers for you at the top of this hour. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your
power consumption in china, impa wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. shibani: breaking news, live pictures from the white house as we wait for president obama to speak in about 15 minutes from now as lawmakers struggle to hammer out a deal on the fiscal cliff. peter barnes believes the president will announce a deal. we will bring you his comments live. it is an early close on the trading day. sandra smith is in the pits where traders are watching every development in washington. she joins us now with today's trade and how commodities are faring. sandra: we just had financial commodities close for the day. the treasury pits just closed minutes ago. it was an interesting close to
in europe, spain, portugal, yes, operationsy, italy. it measures the perception of the corruption in the public sector. as the most corrupt nations in the world. here we go. afghanistan, north korea, and somalia top the list. on the other side of the spectrum, countries with least perceived corruption, denmark, fin left-hand and new zealand. where does the u.s. rank? 19th. tracy: nobody lives in those countries. ashley: what they do is very simple and very clean. tracy: very blond. ashley: very blond. definitely in denmark and finland, that's for sure. tracy: the dark skin, the dark eyes. we're all evil at heart. ashley: that is the quote of the day. thanks, tracy. i didn't say that. tracy: all right. quarter after. come on. right? think about it. as we do every 15 minutes we check on the markets, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. from the most corrupt country in europe, good to have you with us. >> that is me. evil. i'm a little devil at heart. let's take a look at a big deal here. freeport-mcmoran, this is a $9 billion deal. these type of things brin
, impact wool exports from n zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understandhe connections of a complex, global economy. it's ju one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort dsn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means.s...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bnchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbirt may increase your risk of lunginfections, osteoporosis, d some eye probms. tell your doctor if you have a heart con
% in spain. there was an italian debt auction that went over well. that's helping sentiment. the owner of zara, one of the strongest retailers in europe, out with sales. you see that their shares are down. even though their nine-month sales figure was up 17% year on year, they said so far in the fourth quarter that figure was slowing to something in the range of 15%. so still a strong set of figures from inbitex. if you're concerned about the consumer, but not as strong as we have seen in the past. that's what's happening in spain. i want to draw your attention -- use guys were talking about unions. here's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the la
with the omp with spain but they gave you a second put which you guys didn't talk about which is amazing. >> what's the second piece of it then? >> the second piece was when they were just this last meeting and you had this vote, how did the vote go? you know how the vote went for lower interest rates? you guys know how -- can somebody put on their prompter so they can figure out what it is? how did the vote go for lower interest rates? i'll tell you how the vote went. lower interest rates. they didn't lower interest rates this time. what they said, though, if you go back and look at it, every member before voted for lower interest rates. majority for lower interest rates. who didn't vote for lower interest rates? it was azulman, if my pronunciation is wrong, there's no way i'm going to get it right. pittsburgh people, what are you going to do. and this other guy draghi. and there was a fourth guy, begins with a "c." basically you're in this situation, whenever draghi wants to lower interest rates in europe, he can do it. >> but we haven't understood why they haven't done it to this poin
's going to be a lot of protests in spain, for example, today. foreign exchange, if we look at the dollar/yen, we look how quantitative easing is going to be a much more enhanced program in japan after the elections. you can clearly see how the dollar has performed quite admirably against that weakening of the currency issue on quantitative easing. remember, for an export economy, this is not something they're so upset about. last, but not least, even our weakened partner in europe, we just discussed, look how the euro versus the dollar is at some of the best levels we've seen since early may. something to pay attention to. we also had empire index on the weak side. and minus 56 billion on october treasury, international capital flows. that's the weakest level since the summer of 2011. now we're going to go to david faber who's talking about a sprint clear wire deal. how clear is it, david? >> we did get the deal itself, rick santelli. thank you very much. after a couple of months of which we've been talking about this. if you recall, back on october 10th, we got the deal this morning in
and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade, the 1970 's. we have seen that in other countries. raise the rates and you get less investment and a lower st
go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as we now face the pros wekt of a much earlier election in italy. to that end it is fascinating. sylvia berlusconi has come out today warning about the germano center of politics. in other words, too much of a focus on what is happening from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay of a lot of the italian business broadcasts internally. they say our bonds are currently trading so
for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a boost in pc sales. is there anything that can turn that lagging sector around? futures moving lower, as concerns about the fiscal cliff talks weigh on the market. talks about progress toward a deal sent the down lower by almost 521 points on friday. s&p up almost 14% on the year. it's interesting, this year we've had so many unnatural phenomenon taking place, whether it's the effects of the fed's monetary policy, year end, fiscal cliff tax related issues. the motivations are a little bit different this ti
and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. we are in seattle. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. fixed exchange rates. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was that generation's version of 2008. when that collapse happened, what you had was unsustainable debts coming irresponsible banking -- unsustainable that's, irresponsible banking. you had the collapse of the currency. it
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